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Why An Efficient Golf Swing Should Have Lag?

You should have or implement a natural lag in your downswing to create swing speed and be able to correctly connect with the ball. Mainly allow the club to do most of the work naturally in your downswing.

A lag in the golf swing is a crucial concept for golfers of all levels. It refers to the angle formed between the club shaft and the left arm (for right-handed golfers) during the downswing. An efficient golf swing should have lag, as it is the key to hitting powerful and accurate shots. In this article, we will explore why an efficient golf swing should have lag, what causes it, and how you can develop it.

Why An Efficient Golf Swing Should Have Lag?

The lag in the golf swing is created when the wrists are held back during the downswing, while the hips and shoulders rotate toward the target. This creates a whipping motion with the clubhead, resulting in a high clubhead speed and maximum energy transfer at impact. The angle formed between the club shaft and the left arm also allows for the clubhead to be delivered to the ball at a slightly descending angle, which helps produce a clean strike and maximizes distance.

Without lag, the swing lacks power, accuracy, and consistency. The hands and arms take over the swing, resulting in a “casting” motion where the clubhead is released too early, causing a loss of speed and control. This leads to a lack of distance and accuracy, as the clubhead does not make solid contact with the ball, and it is difficult to control the direction of the shot.

In contrast, having lag in the golf swing allows you to transfer your body weight effectively and generate maximum clubhead speed, resulting in longer, straighter, and more consistent shots. It also provides a greater margin of error, allowing you to make minor adjustments during the downswing to correct your swing path and clubface angle.

What Causes Lag in the Golf Swing?

Lag in the golf swing is primarily caused by the proper sequencing of the downswing. A good downswing sequence starts with a lateral shift of the hips toward the target, followed by a rotation of the hips and torso. The arms and hands then drop into the “slot,” creating a lag angle between the club shaft and the left arm.

The angle formed between the club shaft and the left arm is maintained until just before impact, at which point the wrists release and the clubhead accelerates through the ball. The release of the wrists should be a natural consequence of the proper downswing sequence and not something forced or contrived.

How Can You Develop Lag in Your Golf Swing?

Developing lag in your golf swing requires a good understanding of the downswing sequence and proper wrist action. Here are some tips to help you develop lag in your swing:

  1. Start with a good grip: A good grip is the foundation of a good swing. Make sure your grip is neutral, with the club held in the fingers of your left hand and the “V” formed by your thumb and forefinger pointing toward your right shoulder.
  2. Practice the downswing sequence: Practice shifting your weight toward the target, rotating your hips and torso, and dropping your arms and hands into the “slot.” This will help you develop the proper downswing sequence and create the angle between the club shaft and the left arm.
  3. Use a mirror: Use a mirror to check your swing positions and make sure you are maintaining the angle between the club shaft and the left arm during the downswing.
  4. Practice wrist hinge: Practice hingeing your wrists during the backswing and maintaining the angle between the club shaft and the left arm during the downswing. This will help you develop the proper wrist action and create lag in your swing.
  5. Use training aids: There are many training aids available that can help you develop lag in your swing, such as a lag stick, impact bag, or speed stick. These aids can help you develop the proper wrist action and downswing sequence.

Conclusion

Lag is essential for a powerful and efficient golf swing. It allows the golfer to generate maximum clubhead speed and transfer that energy to the golf ball at impact, resulting in longer shots and more consistent ball striking.

To understand the importance of lag, it’s essential to know what it means in the context of the golf swing. Lag refers to the angle formed between the lead arm and the shaft of the golf club on the downswing. In other words, it’s the amount of wrist cock and forearm rotation a golfer retains until the clubhead is close to the ball.

An efficient golf swing with proper lag generates more speed and power. The increased speed comes from the energy stored in the clubhead as it swings down towards the ball. It’s like pulling back a slingshot before releasing it, with the tension in the rubber band providing the power. In the same way, the lag in a golf swing stores energy in the clubhead, which is then transferred to the ball at impact, generating maximum speed and distance.

Lag also contributes to the golfer’s ability to control the clubface and strike the ball accurately. When the wrist is cocked and the clubface is square to the target, it allows for a clean and consistent impact. With less lag, the clubhead is more likely to be open or closed at impact, causing the ball to miss the intended target.

There are several ways to create and maintain lag in a golf swing. Firstly, it’s essential to have a proper grip on the club. The hands should be positioned on the club in a way that allows the wrists to hinge naturally. A grip that’s too tight can limit the wrists’ movement and prevent the golfer from creating lag.

Another way to create lag is to start the downswing with the lower body. The hips should initiate the movement, allowing the upper body to follow. This sequence of movement allows the golfer to retain the wrist cock and forearm rotation until the clubhead is close to the ball.

Maintaining a steady tempo and rhythm in the swing is also crucial for maintaining lag. Rushing the downswing can cause the golfer to release the wrist cock prematurely, leading to a loss of power and accuracy.

Finally, it’s essential to maintain the correct swing plane throughout the swing. The swing plane refers to the path the clubhead takes during the swing. A swing that’s too steep or too shallow can cause the golfer to lose lag, as the clubhead is more likely to move away from the desired swing plane.

In conclusion, an efficient golf swing should have lag for maximum power, accuracy, and control. Lag allows the golfer to store energy in the clubhead and transfer it to the ball at impact, generating maximum speed and distance. To create and maintain lag, golfers should focus on their grip, lower body movement, swing tempo, and swing plane. By mastering these elements, golfers can achieve an efficient and powerful golf swing.

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